Reveal #14

May 29, 2024 |

This one was a wild ride that really expresses the whole range of Grandma’s dusty bottles. It’s got half empty plastic bottles, beautiful figurine style miniatures, things that aren’t even tiny bottles, and something labeled “100 poof.” Never a dull moment in this latest unboxing video.

Prefer to read than watch? Check out the transcript under the video.

TRANSCRIPT

Teaser

Hey, okay, this has redeemed all of its forerunners!

After Opening Credits

Hello and welcome to my Tiny Bottles, the project where I’m exploring my grandmother’s legacy of miniature liquor bottles, one tiny bottle at a time.

Today is another unboxing video, my favorite part. The bottles are in a bunch of different containers, and I’ve started to kind of get a sense of the theme, right?

So… one of the boxes has things that are carefully laid out in card boxes, the “fragile miniatures” they say on top. So those I always close my eyes and grab. There’s another open box that just has bottles standing up and then there’s the box with the paper wrapped things. And sometimes the paper wrapped things are really interesting, and sometimes they’re like plastic bottles of schnapps.

So I try to get a mix. That’s what I’ve done today. And so here is just a glass bottle, no wrapping.

Pulls first bottle.

Malibu Coconut Rum. Very familiar looking to all of us. I don’t need to get the magnifying glass out for this one.

This one? Yeah, I mean it feels… Oh wait, is it solid? Shakes it. No, it’s shaking around. I don’t know if it would solidify. It’s not a cream liqueur. I’ve had enough of those.

Reading label. “Coconut liqueur laced with light Caribbean rum.”

I can’t say I’ve knowingly drank Malibu ever? So I guess I will get indoctrinated.

Reaches in for another bottle.

All right, now… this one did come with some paper around it, just not very well. Unwraps it. It’s a big one that’s… not a tiny bottle at all! It’s a little jug.

I mean, I guess it could have liquid in it, so it probably got kept in the bar area. Okay. Well, thanks, Gram. Reading words on bottle. London, Canada. I lived for many years in London, so I like that.

I always grab one extra when I’m picking from the boxes. So that may come in handy today. Let’s see what else we got.

Oh!  Myers’s Rum! So I talked about Myers’s Original Rum Cream, which is what they made out of it. Seagram’s made that out of it.

That one was in a glass bottle, but the liquid was solid. This one is in a plastic bottle, so (sigh) it’s half empty.

I’m a big rum fan. Pointing behind her. This whole shelf here is rum, and I would love it if some of these rums were in glass bottles and I could look forward to tasting them. But this I imagine will taste nice and caramely!

So yeah, Myers’s, 50 mL, 80 proof, probably 1980s with that plastic bottle.

All right, what else? Reaches into box again. Aha! Glass! Finally, glass!

Looks at bottle intently.

All right, what the hell? Okay. This is, this is maybe not my best day.

All right, so this, this is Old Croak. So Old Croak is described as “Kentucky Straight Embalming Fluid.” It’s got a dead crow on the front of it. And you know, that could be really exciting. But it says “one hundred poof.” “Bobbled by U.R. Stiff.” And it is a non-alcoholic flavoring.

Wow, this will be fun to research. I wonder what it’s supposed to taste like. Alright, (laughing) let’s keep going.

Another bottle.

Hey! (Excited) Okay, this has redeemed all of its forerunners! This is a bottle of Inca Pisco.

Pisco is a brandy, so an unaged, grape brandy, typically from Peru or Chile.

Where is Inca from? Looks through magnifying glass to check. Peru.

I am a big fan of Pisco and I am pretty excited about this. It’s got a tax label which will tell me something, so probably, 1970s, but I don’t know. I have to get in there and really kind of go to my tax label chart to know.

That is just like also just such a cool looking bottle, although like some of the others may pose a little bit of a “how do you get into this?” problem.

Seems pretty full!

Picks up London, Canada jug. All right, this one doesn’t count.

Points to Old Croak. This one only barely counts. How many more do we have in here?

Tammy pulls out last bottle. Just one more. So it is another Cognac. Another brandy. Alright.

I have quite a brandy collection. I’ll probably have them all by the time I’m done.

So yeah, Courvoisier. Cognac, 50 mL, French, pretty standard bottle.

With the Cognac bottles a lot of times to date them there’s a great website that has sort of different brand’s bottles over time. And I can use that to kind of delve in and figure out which time period the Cognac came from. So that’s really useful. All other companies – or fans – you should create those for your website.

I can find tons of examples of these bottles online. Lots of pictures of things, but almost none of them have dates associated with them, which is a little infuriating when I’m trying to date them.

All right, well, Kentucky Embalming Fluid. Good times, good times… But Inca Pisco, so that is going to be a thrill.

If you want to see what I find out about all of these crazy bottles, please do go to mytinybottles.com. Or hit that subscribe button below you can also follow me at @mytinybottles on social media and join the fun. Leave a comment! Leave a like! And I always love to hear from people. Cheers!

 

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2 Comments

  1. I’m guessing the “London Canada” bottle is maple syrup?

    You seem to be accumulating a bunch of coconut rums.

    Reply
    • Hmmm, maple syrup is an interesting idea, but there’s no label or anything on it. I’m thinking it was just a souvenir type thing. And yes, many coconut rums! I have a person picked out to taste them with all with for a grand coconut rum comparison, now we just need to get in the same geographic area!

      Reply

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